Key features of the Ten Pound Poms scheme are as follows:

ten-pound-note

Fares:

  • £10 for adults
  • £5 for children aged 14-18 (free by the 1960s)
  • Free for under 14s

In 1952, the normal cost of an adult fare to Australia was £120 and the average male manual worker’s weekly wage was around £10.

10-pound-note-pattern-detail

Eligibility Criteria:

  • British subjects (including Irish and Welsh)
  • Citizens of the Republic of Ireland were also eligible so long as they were born before 1949
  • White (mixed race Britons unlikely to be accepted)
  • Under 45 (ordinarily, though the scheme was occasionally extended to parents and grandparents)
  • In sound health

Conditions of the Scheme:

  • Stay 2 years in Australia or refund the balance of the fare (around £110)

10-pound-note-pattern-detail

Timeline:

1947 – Scheme started with a bang (400,000 Poms registered at Australia House)

1950 – Britain reduced its contribution to the fare to £25 per adult (was 50%)

1951 – Britain limited its contribution to £500,000 per annum

1954 – Britain limited its contribution to £150,000 per annum (1,000 migrants)

1955 – Australia’s millionth post-war migrant, Barbara Porritt, arrives in Melbourne

1957 – Bring Out a Briton campaign launched

bring-out-a-briton

1969 – Peak year (nearly 80,000 Britons emigrated to Australia)

1972 – Scheme ended

1973 – Cost increased to £20 (£75 per family)

1977 – Australia’s population almost doubled in 30 years to 14 million

Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on Twitter0

Responses